The Carnegie Medal and shadowing in your school

About the Carnegie Medal

The Carnegie Medal is a British literary award that is presented annually to an author of an outstanding new book for children or young adults. It is awarded by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) and was established in 1936. It is named after the great Scottish-born philanthropist, Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919) who founded more than 2800 libraries in the English speaking world, and there is at least one Carnegie library in more than half of British library authorities. He was quoted as saying, “if ever wealth came to me that it should be used to establish free libraries.”

Nominated books must be written in English and first published in the UK during the preceding school year (September to August). The award by CILIP is a gold Medal and £500 worth of books which are to be donated to the winner’s chosen library. There is also the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal which is awarded to an outstanding book in terms of illustration for children and young people. The Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Medals are often described by authors and illustrators as ‘the one they want to win’.

Previous winners of the Carnegie medal include Maggot Moon, The Graveyard Book and River Boy.

Shadowing the judging process in your school

There is a Carnegie and Kate Greenaway shadowing site which aims to inspire and engage thousands of children and young people in reading the books on the shortlist every year. Students are able to post and read reviews, as well as watching exclusive videos, of the shortlisted authors and illustrators talking about their books. There is also a fun Accelerated Reader™ quiz on each of the shortlisted Carnegie Medal titles which is provided by Renaissance Learning. Children and young people “shadow” the judging process and then decide their own favourites.

The scheme engages up to 90,000 children and young people in reading activity and is an excellent way to encourage reading for pleasure in young people and highlights the unique role that librarians play. You can sign up for the Carnegie shadowers, there is an excellent shadowing toolkit and you can read about the benefits of taking part in shadowing.

Using RM Books to support Shadowing in your school

You can use RM Books ebook platform as part of this shadowing scheme, providing your students choice of how and when they’d like to read, and make this an affordable activity for your school, by:

  • putting a few copies of the listed books into your school elibrary so students can take turns to read, or
  • allocating books out to participating students in your “Shadowing Group” that you create within RM Books, using short-term rentals (from only 50p), so each student has their own copy and can read concurrently

Your students can shadow by reading at home on any device or computer with a modern browser, including games systems, PCs, their own tablets and SmartPhones. Schools have used the Shadowing Scheme as an extension activity for more able students, or as a structured reading-for-pleasure programme for all.

Easily find Carnegie Medal nominated titles in RM Books

We have a wide range of titles on RM Books that have been nominated for the 2015 Carnegie Medal including The Jade Boy by Cate Cain, The Company of Ghosts by Berlie Doherty and The Middle of Nowhere by Geraldine McCaughrean.

To help you find nominated books quickly, here’s a list of this year’s nominations and previous years’ nominated authors.

Bron Duly
Lead Educationalist, RM Books

This entry was posted in Awards, Carnegie Medal, RM Books and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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